Sourcetree Version

  1. Sourcetree Download For Windows 10
  2. Sourcetree Version History
  3. Sourcetree Older Version
  4. Sourcetree Version History

Sourcetree is built to aid those new to distributed version control, like Git and Mercurial, as well as to provide advanced users a visual interface from which to work with their repositories. To day we’re providing greater awareness into your builds with the beta of our integration with Bitbucket Pipelines. Mercurial belongs to 'Version Control System' category of the tech stack, while SourceTree can be primarily classified under 'Source Code Management Desktop Apps'. 'Easy-to-grasp system with nice tools' is the primary reason why developers consider Mercurial over the competitors, whereas 'Visual history and branch view' was stated as the key. 91 EUR per year per person for the base version is more expensive than top development IDEs, and is exaggerated. No multi-user and no site licence either, which makes the licence management a pain. This feature is superior to the one that is implemented by SourceTree as it does not reset the file scroll view to the top of the file after.

For the past year or so, we’ve been using Git as our version control system. My introduction to the GUIs around Git was SourceTree (although I’ve made an effort to learn the commands) but I have also used poshgit and Git Bash. Recently, we’ve started using SSH keys instead of HTTPS and I had to learn how to set up my repositories with SSH. Everywhere and everyone tells you this is straight forward and it is when the critical path works but when something is wrong, it gets more difficult. A lot of unnecessarily complex documents does not help either. So I’m going to details all the steps that I took in the hope that it could helps someone.

My setup for this task is Git (you can use the embedded git within SourceTree), SourceTree and BitBucket (previously used Google Drive to host my git repositories).

Sourcetree Download For Windows 10

  • Open SourceTree and click on the Terminal icon (this is Git Bash)

Sourcetree Version History

  • Type the following command in
    • ls –all ~/.ssh (this will list any existing ssh keys in C:Users.ssh, this is the default but can be changed when generating the key).
  • Next, generate the key
    • ssh-keygen –t rsa –b 4096 –C
    • It will ask you where you’d like to store the files, I accepted the default but you can specify a directory if you wish.
    • Then enter a passphrase, I would recommend you provide a passphrase from a security standpoint.
    • You should now see this this:
  • There should be two key files id_rsa (private) and id_rsa.pub now created.
  • Still using the terminal (Git Bash) in SourceTree, type:
    • eval $(ssh-agent). There are many ways to start the SSH agent but this is only way it would work for me. It should give you a process id back, something like, Agent pid 1234
  • Finally using this command to add the new key
    • ssh-add ~/.ssh/id_rsa
    • If successful, the output should say that an identity has been created.
    • You should never have to type in the passphrase again.
  • Log into BitBucket
  • Select the icon on the top right of the browser and select Manage Account
  • From the Security menu, select SSH Key then Add Key
  • Add you public key (id_rsa.pub) to the text area and then Add Key again

Note, your public key in this file is in a different format from what BitBucket expects. My recommendation for this scenario is to go to SourceTree – Tools – Create or Import SSH Keys. This starts a Putty Generator that has the ability to load existing keys. The generator will then show the public key in a user friendly format to be copied and used within BitBucket.

In Stage 1, the SSH key was generated and set up for the Git Bash terminal, now we want to take that SSH key and use it within the SourceTree GUI.

  • First step is to go to Tools – Create or Import SSH Key
  • Load your existing private key in.
  • Click on “Save Private Key”. This has to be saved in the Putty .ppk format. I would recommend that you didn’t save this private key to the .ssh folder in case of conflicts between two keys.
  • Next is to launch the SSH agent – Putty comes with SourceTree.
  • Make sure Pagent is running ( little computer with a hat on sitting in your windows tray).
  • Add the key to the SSH agent by right clicking on Putty Pagent and selecting “Add Key”. It is Pagent that stops the user from entering the passphrase all the time by holding key and making it available to SourceTree.
  • A further step is to add the .ppk key to Tools – Options – General – SSH Client Configuration.

That’s it! I was all around the houses trying to fix various errors and configure. Some of the problems I faced were:

  • Permission denied (public key). I believe it was a combination of errors on my part. One, I had created too many key files in the .ssh directory and it didn’t know what one to choose. Second, I hadn’t set up SourceTree correctly. The SSH key had to be a .ppk key and not the id_rsa key, which I’d generated.
  • Could not open a connection to your authentication agent. I believe this was down to me changing from Putty to OpenSSH. OpenSSH just never launched, no wonder it couldn’t get a connection.
  • It took ages to clone a repository. SourceTree GUI doesn’t give a lot of feedback with what is going on, not like Git Bash. I thought it wasn’t working.

My tip would be to test the connection using “ssh –T [email protected]”. This command with provide decent feedback if you have or haven’t authenticated. So open Git Bash and type this in. Jitsi meet apk.

A good topic for debate is why go to all the trouble of using SSH keys? Why not, use HTTPS and cache you account details in winstore?

Update:

Discovered this morning that if you shut SourceTree down, if you use the Git Bash terminal, you will need to repeat Stage 2.

References

Sourcetree is an efficient way to simplify all of your coding needs.

Sourcetree gives you complete control of your Git, removing the need to use the command line. Its simple GUI enables you to visualize and manage your repositories easily so that you can focus on coding.

Coding made simple

Sourcetree visualizes source code changes in a way that simplifies your coding experience. Both beginning coders and experts will benefit from this program’s ability to manage changes seamlessly.

Streamlining your project code has never been easier. Visual repositories keep track of coding activity, while bookmarks provide a real-time, aggregated view of all of your work. Changeset graphs display work across multiple branches and forks for easy reference.

Command line coding can be intimidating for beginners and tedious for regular coders. Sourcetree sheds light onto the coding process through several functions. It offers a “working copy” section to show you the differences between your work and the Git repository version in real-time.

Branch management allows you to switch between working copies with a single click. The branch history section provides version control by displaying the entire history of changes. Plus, Gitflow structures the workflow while multiple people are contributing.

This program works with any Git repository, whether they be local or remote hosting services, such as Bitbucket Cloud, Microsoft Team Foundation Server, and GitHub. The entire process is efficient, consistent, and requires no setup.

If all of this sounds overwhelming, Sourcetree has a solution. The program includes comprehensive tutorials on all aspects of its use.

Where can you run this program?

This program runs on Windows and Mac operating systems.

Is there a better alternative?

No. Other programs offer different benefits, but none tick all the same boxes as Sourcetree. Other similar quality programs worth investigating are GitKraken and GitHub.

Our take

Sourcetree

Sourcetree provides a valuable service to coders and developers. Command-line coding offers a limited view of overall work, especially when managing large projects. Sourcetree solves this by visualizing everything that is happening simultaneously.

Should you download it?

Yes. It is free and offers tutorials on how to use it, so there is no reason not to try it. At worst, you decide that it's not for you, at best, you discover an amazing program.

Highs

  • Simple to use
  • One-click functionality
  • At-a-glance views of all work
  • Free

Sourcetree Older Version

SourceTreefor Windows

Sourcetree Version History

3.1.2