Acronis Usb Image

Download Acronis Acronis True Image for Sabrent is an integrated software suite that ensures the security of all of the information on your PC. Backups allow you to recover your computer system should a disaster occur. Locate Acronis True Image in your downloads folder, double-click the icon, and follow the steps in the installation wizard. After the installation completes, start Acronis True Image and enter your serial number/product key. In this video i will show you how to install Acronis True Image 2020 on your Windows laptop or desktop computer and how to create a bootable Acronis live res. Create a Linux based, bootable USB key for my Windows 10 system through the Acronis True Image 2020 software. Alter BIOS boot sequence to read the USB first, before Windows 10.

  1. Acronis Usb Image Creator
  2. Acronis True Image Usb Creator
  3. Acronis Usb Image Download
  4. Acronis Usb Tool

Creating a full Windows backup by using the built it Windows Imaging Tool, Acronis TrueImage, EaseUs Todo Backup, or Macrium Reflect is pretty common for experienced computer users. However, it’s recommended for all users to keep backups in case of crashes or hardware failures. If your system is unable to boot, start up the computer with the imaging software’s rescue media and it can restore your system back to the time when you created the image.

Imaging is different from just backing up your files or selected folders because a complete copy is created for the whole hard drive or partition and its structure. The problem with some imaging software is it doesn’t allow creating backup images for external devices such as a USB flash drive, digital camera, or MP3 player. Or perhaps you prefer not to install a complete software package just to back up a small flash drive.

For someone with one or two flash drives, it’s useful to have full backup copies so you can swap between them when required. Here are 7 free and portable tools that you can use to create backup images of USB memory sticks, hard drives, memory cards, and MP3 players, then restore them when you need to.

1. PassMark ImageUSB

ImageUSB is by PassMark software that make tools like Performance Test, BurnInTest, and OSFMount. This little tool is free and portable with a few very handy features such as being able to read and create images from more than one USB flash drive at once and also write a single image back onto more than one flash drive at the same time.

Everything is laid out into numbered steps. Select the USB drive(s) to work on and choose whether to write to the selected drive or create an image from it. Then browse for the backed up file or enter a new name and press the button in step 4 to start the process. You can verify a newly created image or the contents of a written USB drive, uncheck the “Post Image Verification” box if you don’t want to verify.

Backup images are created as uncompressed BIN files. ImageUSB can write those BIN files or ISO image files onto USB. However, writing an ISO file can be troublesome and you might not be able to read the drive contents properly due to the file systems used by ISO images. A log file is created in the same folder for each BIN image which includes MD5/SHA1 checksums for the file and any verification results.

Download PassMark ImageUSB

2. Rufus

Rufus is a USB tool we’ve mentioned before that can perform a number of different functions such as creating bootable USB media. A lesser known feature added in 2018 is the ability to save the contents of the selected USB drive as a disk image. In this case, the image is saved in the popular Virtual Hard Disk format (VHD). Rufus has an installer version but most users probably just use the portable executable.

Saving the USB device as a VHD file in Rufus is very easy. All you have to do is make sure the USB media to copy is selected in the Device drop down at the top, click “Show advanced drive properties” and an icon of a floppy disk will appear at the top right. Cick on the icon, give the output file a name, and press Save. The whole of the device will be saved to an uncompressed VHD image.

Writing the VHD file back to USB is just a case of making sure “Disk or ISO image” is the Boot selection type and pressing the SELECT button to browse for the previously saved VHD file. The useful thing about using the VHD format is the files can be mounted natively in Windows as virtual drives. You can easily view and even edit the contents of the backup image before writing it back to USB later on.

Download Rufus

3. USB Image Tool

USB Image Tool is a portable program that can create full images of USB memory sticks, MP3 players, and any other storage devices that are mounted as USB drives. The program has a drop down option to let you select between taking an image of the whole USB drive or just the first volume on the device. That’s useful if your device has more than one partition although the boot sector will not get saved in Volume mode.

Select the USB drive, click Backup, and choose the file name and save folder. USB Image Tool backs up drives to an uncompressed IMG file by default. To compress an image file, click the “Save as type” dropdown when asked where to save the file. There are options of saving as Zip compressed IMZ or GZip compressed IMG.GZ files. Compression might take a bit longer but could reduce the size of a large image file.

There’s also a Favorites tab where you can keep backup locations stored for quick access. Some options are available such as creating an MD5 checksum with the backup file, showing non-removable devices, verifying the backup, and defining a naming structure for the backup files. The .NET Framework 4.7 is required for non Windows 10 users. A command line usbitcmd.exe is included for advanced usage, such as in scripts.

Download USB Image Tool

4. HDD Raw Copy Tool

Although the name might suggest this program is only meant to copy hard drives, it is also specifically designed to handle all types of media devices. USB flash drives, hard drives, and all types of flash based media and cards are supported. HDD Raw Copy Tool makes a complete sector by sector duplicate of the device irrespective of what partitions or operating systems are present.

On start, you are shown the Source window where you select the USB drive to copy. The next window is the Target window where you have to double click on the File option in the devices list and choose a save name and location. The default save option is a compressed IMGC file although you can select an uncompressed IMG format from the “Save as type” drop down.

Click Continue and then Start to begin the backup. As the backup file will be compressed, it could be much smaller than uncompressed backup files that will be the size of the whole drive. Restoring a backup is a case of swapping things around and selecting the backup file in the Source window and the USB drive in the target window. An installer version is available but the portable version does the job perfectly fine.

Download HDD Raw Copy Tool

On page two we show you more portable image backup tools and also show how to compress backup files more efficiently.

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HeyRadar7 months ago

My issue with all/most of these tools is that you have to have the same size or larger flash drive when you recreate the drive.

I’m going to look into the Easeus ToDo again.

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Yes, their main purpose is to backup and restore onto the same drive, not different drives.

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Friendly9 months ago

Hi, Thanks for this wonderful article. Rufus does it very well for me.

ImageReply

@Maxime: are you using backup or clone? Because clone asks for a drive as target (which I am not interested to), not creating an image, so I guess backup. As backup I see Disk or Partition backup seem to answer the question, but both ask to buy a license. AOMEI Backupper Standard, labelled as Free, but is it really free?

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HAL9000 Author11 months ago

I’ve just installed AOMEI Backupper Standard and it doesn’t ask to buy a license for a disk or partition backup. It’s possible you may be trying to use a Pro feature somewhere while using the backup option. Not 100% sure of that, just a guess.

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PassMark ImageUSB make ISO , why do you say it can be done it has only save as .bin NOT iso

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HAL9000 Author3 years ago

Read the article again, it says you can create a bin file from usb or write a bin/iso onto USB. Where does it say you can create iso files?

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You can delete .bin and write .iso manually. It will work.

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John L. Galt2 years ago

I can delete any file extension and write in another file extension. Does that change the actual file?

Nope.

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These tools are indeed very interesting. My specific need is to copy the folders and files on a USB flash memory stick, where one folder is specifically for “shortcuts”, i.e. hyperlinks to various folders, which works as a kind of table of contents. Everything else that I need to back up works using copy and paste, but not the hyperlinks, which link to the old drive and not the new drive. Is there a solution to this, other than imaging? I mean is there a solution that does not tie up so much empty disk space? If not, then I will work with the limitations of imaging.

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John Ohannessian3 years ago

I did not like any of these flash drive imaging utilities as they only save the complete flash drive image which I do not like as they all create a very large full drive image regardless how small data you have on your flash drive.
Let me explain, if I have a large 256 GB flash drive and I only have a 10 GB data on this drive, all of the above mentioned programs will save the full and complete 256 GB image instead of just the 10 GB data, a complete waste of unnecessary space as they create a very large backup image file.
Unfortunately the popular Macrium Reflect imaging program does not recognize flash drives so this program will not work.
Luckily, the latest Acronis True Image 2018 build 12510 will successfully backup only the 10 GB data image and this backup image file will be much smaller than taking the full (unnecessary) 256 GB flash drive like all the above listed programs do.
Acronis TI is not free but it is the only one I found to do exactly what I want and need.
If you do know of another program that will do exactly what Acronis TI can do and is FREE then please share it here with us all.
Thank you

Reply

Easeus ToDo Backup Free is free and can do the same: an image of the only>

Håkan1 year ago

Failed to backup linux SD card, not even when doing sector by secotr copy, still fails ( all other programs handle that). Lots of popups asking to buy all the time… feel like scam program.

Stay away I say.

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Experienced users will also achieve a MUCH smaller image by first deleting large or excess files: (ALL of these will be regenerated upon next BOOT)
Pagefile.sys
c:windowsprefetch
c:windowstemp
Other TEMP folders
Other TEMPORARY folders
Useless .BAK; .TMP; .OLD files
OFFLINE WEB PAGES
SOFTWAREDISTRIBUTION
INSTALLER
OFFLINE WEB PAGES
SOFTWAREDISTRIBUTION

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Maxime Abbey11 months ago

I know your comment is now 2 years old, but I hope my suggestion will be helpful to those finding this article –
Today (June 2020), AOMEI Backupper just does that on Windows, for free.

I succeeded in backuping a 32 GB flash disk into a 586 MB image, and another 32 GB flash disk to a 6.55 GB image.
The first flash disk was a Dell Restore & Recovery USB media, made with Dell Direct Key Creator (used to restore Dell machines to their factory state).
The second one was a standard Windows 10 Installation disk, made with Windows 10 Media Creation Tool.

Each time, I made the backup image, formatted the drive, and restored the image back to the same drive. Everything was OK, and all restored disks were both bootable and working.
I did not test any other schemas, such as restoring on a smaller or different drive.

The free (Standard) version of AOMEI Backupper is said to be slower than the paid version, but my 32 GB stick (USB 2.0) was backuped quite quickly, as well as my USB 3.0 32 GB stick (Patriot Memory Supersonic). The Patriot (containing the Windows 10 image) was backuped in 1 minute, and restored in two minutes.

Acronis Usb Image Creator

On Linux, you could use the classic dd command with the conv=sparse option.

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Flash drives have gotten so large and cheap that it is common to have a little 500 MB bootable image on a 32 GB flash drive. Since these tools make uncompressed image files, imaging such a flash drive can waste a LOT of space. So the obvious solution is to compress the image files.

What tool(s) would you recommend for that? Which tools happily work with such enormous files, and which are fast enough to not be overly painful to use?

One other thought: to make an image file which is maximally compressible, you should first zero-out the free-space on your flash drive, before making the image file. The easiest way to do that is with Mark Russinovich’s SDelete tool.

For example, if your flash drive is F: then do this from an administrator-level command prompt:

sdelete64 -z f:

You can download SDelete (which includes both 32-bit and 64-bit versions) here:
docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/downloads/sdelete

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Neil van Heerden1 year ago

Great tip, thanks!
I’ve been looking for a way to make smaller images. I also suspect that the longer way(without the zeroing part) causes much more wear and tear on the flash drive’s memory.

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Dave,
Thanks for the info.

I know this is old but hopefully you are still tracking it. It is not working for me. I am probably missing something. I ran sdelete prior to PassMark ImageUSB as indicated, but still got an image file as big as the flash drive total size. This is the process I am using. Could you please help?
1- run sdelete on the flash drive
2- create image with PassMark ImageUSB

thanks,

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Paulo Pestana6 months ago

sdelete is to make the compressed file smaller, you have to compress the image file with for example 7zip or WinRAR, the resulting file will be smaller than the file without running sdelete first because those clusters might be different from zero ( when you delete data you only delete the MBR entry but the data still remains so it’s possible to recover as long as you don’t add more data that can overwite it ).

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Hi All, Thanks RAY for another wonderful article, System Image of USB drives was beyond my thinking ! I tried the robust option : USB Image Tool ( RMPrepUSB for future ) but it takes considerable time to image even a 8gb pendrive on a quite speedy system ! I would like to ask what will be the Best + Fast + Versatile way to image a single vs multiple partitioned USB drive ? In the meantime i would like to explore the installed Macrium Reflect Free for the purpose ! Thanks & Regards.

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Hugo Napoli5 years ago

As always, we are accustomed to your good articles. Thank you.

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Thank u very much. But as u said the image files are as big as the flash drives no matter how much data they contain. Is there any app that will create image files sizing according to the size of the contents in the flash drive?

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Paulchen7 years ago

Which one (if any) can copy a GPT partitionned USB key ?
I failed with ImageUSB.

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I would think options 3 or 4 can do that as they copy the whole drive starting from sector 0.

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leofelix13 years ago

Really useful as usual,
many thanks

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marvelous ray!

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Michael C.13 years ago

Another great tool. Thanks!

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Thanks Raymond.

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Beginner
Comments: 0

I just did a clone of my hard disk to a 128GB USB jump drive. At the start, it said the size of the file is 101GB, so figured I was OK. After the 6 hour clone process, all I have on my usb drive are 2 files: oobedone.flg (1KB) and bios_cur.rcv (8.3MB). Does that sound correct? Also, doing a properties on my usb drive, it now says 8.3MB used and 31MB free, total size 39MB. What happened to my 128GB? Do I have a clone image or not? Is it not recommended to clone to a usb? I'm at a customer site in a remote area and it's all I have.

Legend
Comments: 24718

Eric, welcome to these user forums.

Cloning is intended to make an identical copy of the source drive on an a second drive of sufficient capacity. This should always be done using the offline Acronis bootable Rescue Media and it is recommended that the target drive be installed in the computer in place of the source drive, which should be connected externally via a USB-SATA connector or in a caddy.

I suspect that when you say 'clone' you may actually mean making a backup of your source HDD drive which creates a True Image Backup (.TIB) container file to hold the compressed contents backed up from the source drive. You cannot boot into Windows from the .TIB file or from a clone of the source drive written to a USB drive.

Please see the following KB documents that provide much more information on this subject:
56634: Acronis True Image: Cloning Disks
1540: Difference between Backup and Disk Clone
58816: Acronis True Image 2017: Creating Acronis Bootable Media

Forum Hero
Comments: 8349

Pretty sure that cloning is not supported to a flash drive since flash drives are not bootable for Windows - suprised it would even allow it to be picked as the destination disk.

Even if the clone was successful (which it may be), Windows can only read the 1st partition of a paritioned flash drive (Windows limitation) so I suspect that's why you only see a small amount of data listed now.

You should format your drive completley. used diskpart (launch command prompt by right clicking and run as admin)

diskpart.exe

list disk
(select the # of the one that representes your USB flash drive)

clean

Then go into computer management / diskmanagement and 'initialize' the disk and assign it a drive letter.

Alternatively, use the free tool, minitool parition wizard and format it with that instead.

Ultimately, a clone does you no good and neither would a backup and recovery to a UsB flash drive. Only thing your flash drive is good for is using it as a backup location for a backup .tib file of the original drive. You could then restore that backup file to another internal SATA hard drive in the event that the orignal dies, needs to be replaced or upgraded.

(01). MVP WinPE Builder (02). MVP LogViewer
(03). MVP Google Drive (04). Cleanup Utility
(05). Cloning Correctly (06). Clone vs Backup
(07). Community Tools (08). Contact Support
(09). Product Documentation (10). OS MBR vs UEFI
(11). BOOT MBR vs UEFI (12). Common OEM Drivers

Products: True Image / Snap Deploy / Revive / Disk Director
Regular Poster
Comments: 104

Eric, welcome to these user forums.

Cloning is intended to make an identical copy of the source drive on an a second drive of sufficient capacity. This should always be done using the offline Acronis bootable Rescue Media and it is recommended that the target drive be installed in the computer in place of the source drive, which should be connected externally via a USB-SATA connector or in a caddy.

I suspect that when you say 'clone' you may actually mean making a backup of your source HDD drive which creates a True Image Backup (.TIB) container file to hold the compressed contents backed up from the source drive. You cannot boot into Windows from the .TIB file or from a clone of the source drive written to a USB drive.

Please see the following KB documents that provide much more information on this subject:
56634: Acronis True Image: Cloning Disks
1540: Difference between Backup and Disk Clone
58816: Acronis True Image 2017: Creating Acronis Bootable Media

Does Acronis 2019 still have the following limitations on Windows 10 system?

1. Cannot clone from source to target when target is on USB drive?

2. If both M.2 SSD NVMe drives are internal ( one new, other source ), can use Acronis 2019 app to clone from inside of windows ( instead of booting from USB created with Acronis Survival Kit ) since it creates a VSS shadow first, then copies to the new M2 in the system.

Forum Moderator
Comments: 6067

Acronis True Image Usb Creator

Does Acronis 2019 still have the following limitations on Windows 10 system?

1. Cannot clone from source to target when target is on USB drive?

2. If both M.2 SSD NVMe drives are internal ( one new, other source ), can use Acronis 2019 app to clone from inside of windows ( instead of booting from USB created with Acronis Survival Kit ) since it creates a VSS shadow first, then copies to the new M2 in the system.

Hi!
1. Should be no issue, check out Cloning to External USB Drive
2. Possible with Active Cloning feature https://kb.acronis.com/content/61665

Best regards,
Ekaterina Surkova Forum Moderator

Information provided AS-IS with no warranty of any kind.

To contact support, please follow http://www.acronis.com/en-us/support

Forum Hero
Comments: 8349

Acronis Usb Image Download

It doesn't work with flash/thumb drives that are considered 'removable' in Windows disk management. Those have never been usable for cloning. Cloning has worked with external USB drives that are considered 'fixed' disks (those that aren't flash/thumb drives) for as long as I can remember though.

Acronis Usb Tool

Just wanted to reference for others. Jiffy lube tire rotation prices. SG and I have been testing PCIE NVMe drives in the latest USB external enclosures and cloning works great with them in 2019 too. You do have to take the NVMe drive out and mount it in the be PC if you want to boot it though.