About Amazon Photos

Amazon Photos lets you back up, organise and share all of the photos and videos from your phone, computer and other devices. You can access all your photos on nearly any device and share them with family and friends. The photo storage app keeps your photos and videos safe, even if your phone is lost. Plans start at $1.99 a month and you can cancel any time. Securely store, print, and share photos and view them as a virtual photo album on Amazon devices like Fire TV, Echo Show, and Fire tablets. Save your photos to the Amazon Photos app, then safely delete them from devices like your phone or camera to free up space. Tulip One Step 18-Color Tie-Dye Kit. Product stats: Category: Arts, Crafts & Sewing.

Amazon Native Tribes Photos and Videos

Amazon-Indians.org is a resource for photos and videos of native indigenous people of the Amazon Rainforest. It is an educational resource and an introduction to the cultures of Amazon native tribes from the South American Amazon River Basin. Furthermore, this website is a resource for information and geographic maps of the native indigenous tribes of the Amazon Rainforest. Various indigenous people of the Amazon are represented, including the Matis, Matsés-Mayoruna, Huaorani, Bora, Shipibos, Yagua, Marubo, Ticuna, Kayapó, Suyá, and Xingu Amazonian native tribes. Various ceremonies and rituals are illustrated, most importantly the Ceremony of Mariwin, Matsés-Mayoruna Poison Frog Ceremony, Dance of Queixada, Ritual of Capybara, Ticuna Indian Girls Puberty Rite of Passage, Marubo Ceremony of Aco, and the Kuarup (Kwarup) Ceremony of the Dead. Moreover, various Amazon native tribe legends are told, including Bari Rahua and the Discovery of the Grand Cosmos, the Amazon Indian Tribe Legend of The Pink Dolphin, and the Amazon Native Tribe Legend of The Victoria Regia. Various aspects of the cultures of the indigenous people of the Amazon are covered, as well as hunting with blowguns and curare. In particular, the blowguns of the Matis and Yagua native amazonian tribes are illustrated. Moreover, photos of native facial tattoos and body tattoos are shown. Amazon native tribe bilingual education of girls and boys is also highlighted. Please check out our recent articles on the Huaorani Indians, the 'Warriors of the Amazon' and on the Yanomami Indians, 'The Fierce People.' Recently, pictures of naked uncontacted Amazon Indians have made headlines worldwide. Some of these newspaper reports have been controversial and confusing, hence we have added several articles to help clarify and summarize what is known about these nude uncontacted Amazon tribes. Please refer to our new articles on 'Uncontacted Amazon Indians in Peru,' and 'Uncontacted Amazon Tribe: The Cabellos Largos' to learn more about indigenous Amazonian natives living in voluntary isolation from the rest of the world. To learn about the most recently contacted tribe in the Amazon, please see our new essay on the Korubo Indians, also known as the 'Caceteiros' or 'Head-Bashers.' The Korubo Indians have been described in the news as a nude tribe living in voluntary isolation, with all the members of their tribe still living naked in the jungle. In addition, Amazon-Indians.org has the great honor of exclusively publishing for the first time on the Internet, the historic photographs taken by Amazon explorer and photographer, Chuck Clark. During the 1960s, Clark captured images of many indigenous Amazonian communities, who until that time, were uncontacted tribes, living in voluntary isolation from the Western world.

In addition to articles, legends, geographic maps, photographs and four photo galleries of Amazonian native tribes,five videos are offered about the Matis Amazon Indian tribe. In the first video of the series ('The Matis'), the Matis tribe is introduced, showing a wide variety of activities, including cooking, blowgun hunting, making fire with a hand-drill and fireboard, preparing and using medicinal plants, and various ceremonies and rituals (Dance of Queixada, Ritual of Capybara, and the Ceremony of Mariwin). The second video ('The Hunting Camp') focuses on the material culture of the Matis and no ceremonies or dances are featured. Instead this documentary illustrates the day to day life of the Matis Amazon Indian Tribe, including food and cooking, weaving, making curare poison, building shelter, and hunting. Both 'The Matis' and 'The Hunting Camp' documentary films are unique in that they reenact the traditional lifestyle of uncontacted tribes living in voluntary isolation, with all the participants being traditionally dressed (or you might say, undressed, as the Matis traditionally wore no clothing whatsoever). The third video of the series ('Guardians of the Rainforest') picks up where the second video leaves off and begins with demonstrations of making ceramics, extracting dyes for body painting, making body piercings, imbibing a spiritual tea, shamanism, and several ceremonies. The fourth Matis video ('The Shaman's Way') continues with teaching viewers about indigenous Amazonian shamanism which is illustrated through various ceremonies and rituals. In particular, the use of the toxin (called kambo, kampo, kampu, or acate by various Amazonian tribes) from a poison tree frog (Phyllomedusa bicolor) is illustrated. In addition, medicinal plant use by the Matis Indians is covered in this fourth video of these indigenous people of the Amazon. The fifth and final video ('Last of the Hunters') is dedicated to the technology that the Matis Indians use for hunting in the Amazon Rainforest with blowguns. The Matis indigenous hunters are the world's foremost experts in the use of blowguns and this video takes an in-depth view of blowguns, from how poison darts are manufactured and the application of curare poison, to how these indigenous people of the Amazon stalk and capture prey with their blowguns.

One the of Matis videos available on this website has received international acclaim by having been accepted to be screened at the Nepal International Indigenous Film Festival, 2011 (NIIFF 2011). April 23, 2011 marked the premiere of the short film Kana which was produced by Amazon-Indians.org. Kana was the only film from Peru to be accepted for screening at this prestigious indigenous film festival and Amazon-Indians.org was privileged to have been part of this prominent event. The short film Kana is not for sale, but similar documentary films are available on the Matis video webpage.

Free with yourMatis video download or DVD purchase, you will get a password that will give you free access to the new Amazon-Indians.orgmember's area. This exclusive VIP area is divided into 6 different categories: videos, books, magazines, maps, dictionaries, and Brasil Indigena. In the member's area you will find a 'motherlode' of invaluable information about indigenous Amazonians. Specifically, these materials have been selected so that you can use this information to plan your journey to the Amazon Rainforest and encounter real indigenous Amazonians rather than an expensive tourist trap. For example, one can watch videos of different Amazonian tribes and this will give you an idea of the sorts of activities that you can participate in during your encounter with native Amazonians. In addition, there is a map library that shows precisely where the different Amazonians tribes are located. To increase your knowledge about the various indigenous tribes, there are numerous magazine articles and books that will teach you about native Amazonians. One thing that will help your being accepted by your native hosts, is being able to speak to them in their native tongue and there are dictionaries of different Amazonian languages which will help you speak to your native hosts in their own language. By getting access to the member's area, all customers who purchase the Matis videos will receive 'insider's information' about the Amazon and its people. This information will save you thousands of dollars as you will be able to avoid commercial tour guides. Normally, it is much better to make direct contact with authentic indigenous people and have them act as your hosts without middlemen tour guides exploiting them.

Recently, the Machigenga (also called the Machiguenga or Matsiguenka) Indians from Manu National Park in Peru have been featured on television by the Travel Channel in association with the Discovery Channel. Hidden from the television viewers is the fact that this 'reality show documentary' allegedly resulted in the demise of eight members of the Machigenga tribe due to the negligence of the producer and fixer of this television show. According to a detailed report by the Association of Social Anthropologists (ASA), Matt Currington and Deborah McLauchlan (the producer and fixer, respectively of the 'World's Lost Tribes: Mark and Olly Living with the Machigenga' series) allegedly entered a restricted area without permits while ill with an upper respiratory infection, causing an epidemic among 80 people and the loss of life of eight Amazonian Indians of recently contacted Machigenga (Machiguena) Indians living in a situation of initial contact with the outside world. The original epidemic occurred in November of 2007 after Currington and McLauchlan entered the area scouting for a tribe of Amazon Indians to feature in their 'Living with the Tribe' documentary series starring Mark Anstice and Olly Steed. Incredibly, Currington did not stop plans to start filming the Machigenga (Machiguenga) after learning about the epidemic and the loss of lives that he allegedly caused, and in February of 2008 the Federacion Nativa del Rio Madre de Dios y Afluentes (FENAMAD), which is the indigenous rights association representing Amazonian natives living in Manu National Park, sought to stop Currington by publicly denouncing him and CICADA Productions who were the contractors for this Discovery Channel project. After a subsequent investigation, Currington and CICADA Productions were blacklisted by INRENA (the Peruvian equivalent of the US National Park Service) and have been prohibited from any future access to the area and the indigenous people living there.

In their quest to feature recently contacted nude tribes on the television, filmmakers are putting the survival of these South American Amazonian Indians in jeopardy. Recently contacted and uncontacted Amazonian Indians are extremely vulnerable, both epidemiologically and socially. Generally, they lack resistance to common western illnesses such as influenza and tuberculosis. In addition, their exploitation and manipulation by outsiders who take advantage of recently contacted Amazon Indian tribes can create social problems and internal conflicts, resulting in their cultural degradation and demise. The recent rise in popularity of 'reality show documentaries' of indigenous people is a new threat to the cultural survival of Amazonian Indians.

For some of the best information and photos on Amazonian tribes, please visitAmazon-Tribes.com. The images on this website are quite spectacular, and give a rare glimpse into the traditional culture of the Waorani (Huaorani) Indians of Ecuador and the Korubo Indians of Brazil. In addition, they present these fantastic pictures in a pleasurable and well-designed format allowing one to gain an insight into the daily lives of Amazonian tribes with accurate information about their material culture and traditional beliefs. Other excellent websites on indigenous tribes of South American includeAmazonz.info andMatses.info. For photos and information on indigenous people of the Andes Mountains of South America please visit, IncaTrails.org,Camino-Inca.info, and IquitosNews.com. To learn about African natives, check out African-Tribe.com. To help preserve the Amazon Rainforest and its native people, please support theFriends of the Amazon.

In November 2020, Google killed off its long-standing offer of free, unlimited high-resolution photo storage to anyone with a Gmail account. The new restrictions on Google Photos make a lesser-known competitor, Amazon Photos, suddenly of greater interest.

Amazon Photos is free for anyone with an Amazon account, but without Amazon Prime membership, you're limited to 5GiB. But if you are a Prime member, you get unlimited, original-resolution photo storage at no additional cost. (Videos still have a 5GiB cap.)

There's also one gotcha on how the service can be used—according to the TOS, Amazon Photos is for non-commercial, personal use only. You can take photos, you can share them with your friends and family, and so forth—but you can't run a photography business on the service without violating its terms.

A not-so-new challenger appears

Amazon Photos isn't new—in fact, it launched six years ago, in November 2014. But with both iOS and Android offering cloud photo storage built into the operating system itself, Amazon Photos hasn't been as high-profile. Google's free, unlimited storage particularly made a third competitor seem like a non starter.

Is Amazon Photos Safe

However, iCloud and Google both demand subscription fees now for more than a few GiB of storage. In Apple's case, you get 5GiB free; in Google's, 15GiB (including Gmail and Gdrive). While this may be enough for some people, it gives rival Amazon a fresh chance to shine.

Mobile app walkthrough

I installed Amazon Photos today and took it for a spin. It automatically backed up all 2,000 or so photos (and 4GiB of video) from my Pixel 2XL over the course of the day without any problem. It did not, however, do anything with photos that had been deleted from the phone's local storage but were present on the linked Google Photos account. (If you need to migrate photos directly from Google's cloud to Amazon's, you'll need to do so manually.)

Amazon Photos is available for use immediately, even while it's backing up your device photos in the background. It was quite responsive and functional during the backup and seemed to be indexing photos by image recognition nearly as quickly as they were uploaded.

Amazon Photos desktop app

There's also an Amazon Photos desktop app for Windows and macOS. For the most part, the desktop app is just a way to automatically sync photos from your PC just as you would from your phone. While you can use it to browse your photos, almost all actual work you'd do with them—including but not limited to editing—is done in a Web browser window the Photos app launches automatically as and when you need it.

If you don't want to automatically back up photos and videos from your PC, you don't need the desktop app at all—you can just visit Amazon Photos directly from your Web browser itself.

Editing photos

You can edit photos online, or within the Amazon Photos mobile app. (Selecting a photo to edit from the desktop app just launches a browser window.) I found the editor serviceable—it offers most of the same features Google Photos does, and they operate smoothly and quickly.

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Are Amazon Photos Private

There are pros and cons to both Google's and Amazon's online editors, both of which err on the side of simplicity rather than feature-completeness. Amazon Photos, unlike Google, offers automatic cropping to common aspect ratios including square, 4:3, and 16:9. But Amazon's selection of filters seems loaded with not-very-useful crapola, with a significantly clunkier interface than Google's.

Google also gets the win in general image adjustments. Amazon offers adjustments to brightness, saturation, contrast, gamma, clarity, exposure, shadows, and highlights—but they're all manual. There is no counterpart to Google's generally excellent, one-size-fits-all 'auto adjust.'

Amazon offers text captioning in its browser-based editor, which Google does not—but the typeface selection is limited and pretty crappy. The default 'Open Sans' is fine, and Oswald is a perfectly serviceable option if you prefer sarifs—but most of the rest seem like the kind of weird crap you'd find in a 1990s desktop publishing program.

The mobile editor on Android is largely similar to the online version pictured above but with a few more options and a slightly more polished interface. In particular, it offers stickers, overlays, and free-form doodling, none of which are present in the browser version. Eve pve.

Hardcopy, merch, and decor

Both Amazon and Google offer prints, books, and hangings based on your photos and albums—but I have to hand the decisive win to Amazon in this category on sizes, styles, options—and for the most part, price as well.

When buying photo prints, Google only gives you one choice—the size of the print, which can be 4×6, 5×7, or 8×10 inches. After choosing a size, Google offers you a selection of local photo printing services—all drugstores, in my area—and sends your photo off to the drugstore for you to pick up later.

Amazon offers photo prints in Glossy, Matte, Lustre, or Pearl finishes in sizes ranging from 4×5.3 inches through a whopping 20×30 inches and ships them to you directly—and the prices are better, too. Google charges $2.84, $2.99, or $3.99 for an 8×10 print in my area, depending on which service I choose—Amazon only wants $1.79 for the same print in either matte or glossy finish.

Google also offers a canvas wall hanging print option and a photo book option. Amazon offers both of those—along with photo cards, calendars, wood panels, aluminum prints, mugs, blankets, mousepads, Christmas ornaments, and more.

Of course, you can use independent print-on-demand services no matter who houses your photos.. but if you just want to click in your album and make it happen, Google doesn't even seem to be playing in the same league as Amazon when it comes to physical merch.

Image recognition assisted search

Amazon's image recognition assisted search works quite well—easily on par with Google's and possibly better, for many categories of object. When searching my photos for 'cat,' each service got some that the other missed—but Amazon detected more of them by far. (Both services also had trouble figuring out the difference between my cats and my dog—but to be fair, the dog herself has the same problem.)

What Happened To Amazon Photos

In particular, Amazon's image recognition is almost uncannily good at picking out cats in the background—even when they're very small parts of the image. In the first picture in the gallery above, it found my gray tabby Mouser in the shadows, nested into my clean laundry, much of which is the same color as he is. In the second, it found the creepy, Siamese-cat-shaped 1950s TV lamp on a knick-knack shelf in my office. Google didn't win at 'find the cat' in either case, or in many others.

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When it comes to detecting humans and putting names to them, Google comes in at a huge and unsurprising advantage—it knows who I am, who my wife is, and who my kids are.. all by name. It even knows one of my cats by name, although it doesn't seem to have learned who the other cat or the dog are yet. Amazon doesn't know any of this.. which may be either feature or bug, depending on where your personal privacy<-->convenience slider is set.

Should you want Amazon to have a better handle on who your family and friends are, you have the option of applying names to faces in its People dialog, where it will show you a selection of faces it has discovered in your photos. It's still not as good at facial recognition as Google is, though—it only found me in 37 photos and my daughter in seven, while Google found pages upon pages of both of us.

Albums, sharing, and Family Vault

About Amazon Photos

Amazon Photos allows you to organize your photos into albums and to share those albums selectively with friends, family, and/or the entire Internet. Contacts can be organized into Groups, so you don't need to share albums to twenty different people in your family every time—you can make one 'family' group and just give that group access to the albums they should be able to see.

You can also offer group membership by way of a special link, rather than directly by contacts—send somebody the link to join an Amazon Photos group (or publish that link in a blog post) and, presto, they click the link and get immediate access.

There's also a 'Family Vault' whose purpose wasn't spelled out very clearly within the app itself. Basically, the Family Vault is another way to share photos with five of your closest friends and/or family members—you can add any or all photos or albums to the Family Vault, and once added, all up-to-six of you can see them. More importantly, your five friends and family get unlimited Amazon Photos storage of their own by way of your Prime account.

About Amazon Photos

As long as any one of the members of a Family Vault has a Prime account in good standing, all six share unlimited storage for their own photos. All Family Vault members are able to add—or, crucially, not add—their photos to the Family Vault, just like the original member does.

Conclusions

As a Prime member—and owner of an aging Pixel 2XL that is starting to have its own cloud storage limits imposed—Amazon's offer of free and unlimited photo storage to Prime members caught my eye. I've been using Google Photos as an automatic backup service for the photos I take with my Pixel for a while now, and it performs admirably.. but the new limits make me nervous.

After spending a day playing with it, I can tell you that Amazon Photos works perfectly well for my needs, and I suspect it will work for most Google Photos users' needs as well. It offers simple editing, including cropping, filters, level adjustment, and fairly flexible text captioning. You can organize photos into albums. Image recognition on par with Google's offers photo search capabilities if, for example, you want to find pictures with cats in them. And your mobile browser and social media apps will automatically 'see' your Amazon Photos account as a place to look when uploading photos, just as they do with Google Photos.

If you're a Prime member, you might want to consider Amazon Photos as an additional service, even if you don't plan to replace Google or Apple outright—it gets you a free, easy backup if nothing else. Accidentally deleted files from Google Photos will still be present on Amazon Photos.. and a catastrophic screwup made by the cloud provider itself won't reach across the aisle, either.